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Quill/Platform Pedal Gallery and Time Line



 

       

 

                 

                       
                                       

 

 

     

 

     
   

 

                                 

                                           

       

 

 

 

       

               

   

       

 

     

 

     

           

 

       

   

                       

           

 

 

 

 

     

 

 

       

           

 

               
Clipless Road Pedal Gallery and Time Line
MTB-Specific Clipless Pedal Gallery and Time Line

Toe Clips, Toe Straps
and Shoe Cleats Gallery


Lallement 1860's

France
The first bicycle pedal to receive a U.S. patent, invented by Pierre Lallement. Made of brass with a counterbalance weight to keep it upright. Rotated directly on the spindle.

 

Facon Bobine 1870's

France
Wooden sleeve without bearings.

 

Standard #1 1880's

USA
Originally produced by the Standard Co., these high quality pedals were one of the most widely used designs of this period. The Standard Co. was later acquired by Torrington and these pedals became known as Torrington #1 pedals. These pedals were available until the early 1930s.

 

Columbia #81 1890's-1900's

USA
These deluxe rat trap pedals came from a 1902 Columbia #81 shaft-drive bicycle.

 

Unknown -1890's

USA
No information is currently available regarding these well preserved pre-1900's pedals.


 

Columbia 1895

USA
From a woman’s Columbia bike. Has hearts stamped in cage and ball bearings.


 

Ramsey Swinging 1898

USA
The tread was offset below the axis for “automatic ankle action, no dead center . . . money refunded if Ramsey pedals do not enable you to ascend hills
with 25% less energy”.

 

Unknown Pre-1900

USA
Early rat trap pedals with a brass barrels and squared wrench areas on the spindle.


 

Hartford? 1901

USA
Nicely made pedal with white rubber grip pads added to improve traction. These pedals came from a 1901 Hartford Ladies Bicycle.

 

Chater Lea 1905

England
This "Roadster" model is first listed in the 1905 Chater Lea components calalog.  This particular pair of pedals has interesting provenance as well.  Chester Nelson won the 1928 US National Championships title on them.

 

Record "Quill" 1900's

USA
Nicely made racing pedals with very aggressive gripping teeth.

 

Record "Rat Trap" 1900's

Early example of a "Rat Trap" pedal.

 

Bridgeport Competition 1900's

USA
Made by the Bridgeport Gun Implement Co., which was later acquired by the Torrington Co.

 

Record "Adjustable" 1900's

USA
The unique design of these pedals allows the width of the platform to be adjusted so that it will actually grip the outer edges of the riders shoe sole for improved traction on the pedal.

 

Standard Co. Star  1900's

USA
This popular rat trap design was made by the Standard Co. of Torrington CT. The Standard Co. was later acquired by the famed Torrington Co

 

Look 1910's

USA
Look name stamped in body. No relation to the contemporary French pedal company.

 

Bianchi 1920's

Italy
These rare and beautiful nickel plated rat trap pedals are branded with the Bianchi "B" in the cage plates. The solid center barrels are fitted with oil ports for convenience.

 

Gloria  1930's

Italy
These rare rat trap racing pedals were produced by Gloria Bicycles, an early high-end bicycle builder in Milan. Founded in 1922, Gloria is famous as the company where Faliero Masi, Cino Cinelli and Ernesto Colnago all apprenticed before they each went on to found their own legendary marques.

 

Hobbs of Barbican "Lytaloy" Pedals  1930's

England
Hobbs of Barbican produced high quality lightweight bicycles and a variety of high-end components, including pedals, from the 1930's to the mid 1950's. The barrel of the Hobbs pedal is made of chromed steel and the cage plates, frame plates and dust caps are all made of aluminum. The back of the spindle is drilled for lightness and a felt washer and gasket are used to seal the pedal from contamination. Lastly, "HoB" is cleverly and boldly stamped into the cage plates for maximum brand visibility.

 

Lyotard Marcel Berthet  1930's

France
This is the first generation Marcel Berthet pedal made by Lyotard and named after the famous French cyclist. This rare early version pedal differs from the later Berthet pedals in a number of design features. The most noticeable differences are the dimpled pedal surface and the extra long and "solid" toe flip on this version. This pedal also doesn't have the bent-up lip on the platform necessary for use with slotted cleats nor does it have the alloy toe strap guide plates found on the later versions. Lastly, this pedal has a fancier chromed dust cap made of machined brass instead of a lower cost type made from stamped steel found on later pedals. The toe flips on this model are stylishly embossed "M B, P. Lyotard, Brevete, S.G.D.G". The "Brevete" means patented and "S.G.D.G." roughly translates to Incorporated.

 

Brampton 1930's

England
An early rat trap design by one of the biggest component makers of its era.

 

BSA Rat Trap 1930's

England
Advertised as having cage plates made from "saw blade" steel. These BSA pedals have absolutely the sharpest teeth we've ever encountered.

 

 Pelisier 1930's

France
The quills have likely been removed from these logoed pedals to make them velodrome friendly.

 

 Unknown 1930's

USA
No information is currently available on the history these pedals.

 

Torrington Molded Rubber #15 Pedals  1930's
USA
These rare (and exotic in their day) pedals came on the super high-end bikes of the 1930's. They were fitted on vintage Elgin Robin, Colson, Schwinn Motorbike, Autocycle, Shelby Airflow, Hiawatha Arrow and Dayton Streamlined bikes.

 

Torrington
Signal Pedals 1930's

USA
These rare jeweled "Signal" pedals were used on late 1930's Deluxe Columbias and other high end prewar balloon tire bikes. The reflectors on these early pedals were made out of glass.

 

Torrington #18 1930's - 1940's
USA
This all-steel men's pedal has the special "blackout" finish common to Torrington pedals during wartime.

Torrington #10s
1930's – late 1940's

USA
Made in Torrington, CT the #10's were only available on the deluxe balloon tire bicycles such as the Schwinn Autocycle. These premium quality pedals originally sold for about $2.60 per pair. Now if you can find a rare pair of new #10's they will cost about $300.

 

Standard #No.3
1900's – 1940's

USA
Originally produced by the Standard Co., these high quality pedals were one of the most widely used designs of this period. The Standard Co. was later acquired by Torrington and these pedals became known as Torrington 3-Star pedals. These pedals were available until the 1940s.

 

Torrington Streamline #15 1930's – 1950's

USA
Would you pay $400 for these?
Torrington's best pedal came as original equipment on high-end balloon tire bicycles. A new pair sells for over $400 today!

 

Torrington 4-Star 1935

USA
4-Star pedals were said to have come stock on early Schwinn Paramounts. The retail price of a new set was $3.70 in the 1940's.

 

Torrington #5 Professional Racer 1930's – 1950's

USA
The Professional #5 was Torrington's premium professional racing pedal. The example shown has had both its outside cage plates trimmed in order to provide better cornering clearance for track racing. Originally, the cage plate "wings" would extend outward equally on both the insides and outsides of the pedal.

 

Chater Lea 1930's – 1940's

England
These pedals proceeded the Tommy-Bar version with the same body. These dual sided pedals also featured stainless steel cage plates.

 

Chater Lea 1930's – 1940's

England
Nice touring pedals from the high-end British components maker.

 

Chater Lea "Sprint" 1930's - 1950's

England
The "Sprint" was Chater Lea's top of the line racing model of pedal and was a favorite on both road and track bikes. It was designed to be a single-sided pedal in order to maximize cornering clearance. The cage plates are made of stainless steel and the barrel is made of chromed steel. Chater Lea Manufacturing Co. Ltd. of Letchworth, Herts was established in 1890 and had a reputation for making very high quality and very expensive components. In addition to pedals, Chater Lea made hubs, bottom brackets, cranksets and headsets.

 

Union Rat Trap 1930's-1940's

Germany
These exceptionally well made pedals
were a favorite of track racers.

 

Conloy Viper 1930's-1950's

England
The rare Viper version dual-sided pedal
from Conloy.

 

Conloy BOA 1930's-1950's

England
A nice steel quill pedal made by BSA. Very similar to BSA's own pedal except that the BOA has alternately twisted teeth.

 

Lyotard #38 1930's - 1940's

France
A very early version of a Lyotard "Rat-Trap" pedal.

 

Lyotard - L. Faucheux 1930's - 1960's

France
The Faucheux model is one of the rarest and nicest looking pedals produced by Pierre Lyotard's company.

 

RFG Rat Trap 1930's - 1940's

France
Made by RFG of Saint Etienne, a high quality component maker that in addition to pedals also made Bottom Brackets, Headsets and Hubs. These pedals are one of the more beautiful pedal designs in this collection.

 

RFG Rat Trap 1930's - 1940's

France
Made by RFG of Saint Etienne, a high quality component maker that in addition to pedals also made Bottom Brackets, Headsets and Hubs.

 

RFG Rat Trap 1930's - 1940's

France
Made by RFG of Saint Etienne, a high quality component maker that in addition to pedals also made Bottom Brackets, Headsets and Hubs.

 

Tank Styx 1930's - 1940's

France
A nicely designed steel pedal with an alloy dust cap from this respected French maker.

 

Gnome et Rhone 1940's

France
These rare lightweight rat trap pedals have aluminum cages, barrels and dust caps. The propeller insignia is a result of Gnome et Rhone’s history of producing airplane and automobile engines and parts beginning in 1905. They were a major producer of airplane engines during both World Wars. Until they ceased production in about 1950, Gnome et Rhone also produced a variety of motorcycles.

 

Legnano 1940's

Italy
This Legnano branded pedal set features a chrome plated solid steel center with an alloy quill and dust cap. Its similar design suggests the possibility that these pedals were manufactured for Legnano by Noli-Cattaneo in Pavia.

 

Wippermann 1940's

Germany
Made by the same company famous for their quality chains.

 

Holdsworth-Allez 1940's -1950's

England

Lyotard Marcel Berthet 1940's – 1970's

France
Made by Pierre Lyotard’s pedal company and named after Marcel Berthet, the French cyclist and three time world hour record holder. Berthet set hour records in 1907 and twice in 1913. Berthet was the chief rival of Oscar Egg who also posted 3 early records in the "Ride To Nowhere". Berthet went on to race early human powered vehicles, called velocars. In 1933 at age 43, Berthet rode his teardrop shaped aerodynamic bicycle to a then world record of 49.99 kilometers in one hour.

 

Chater Lea 1940's

England
This is the "tommy bar" version of the Chater Lea pedal because it's installed with a screwdriver through the hole, not a wrench. The side plates are made of stainless steel.

 

Brampton B8 1940's

England
These beautifully designed pedals graced many of the great british brands of the 40's.

 

BSA 1940's

England
Steel quill pedals made by Birmingham Small Arms. These pedals were top-of-the-line equipment on British racing bikes. Built-in grease injector in the dustcap makes maintenance easy.

 

Cyclo Oppey 1940's

England
Made by Cyclo and named after champion Australian cyclist turned politician Sir Hubert Opperman. Opperman was the Australian champion in '24, '26, '27, and '29 and rode the Tour de France in 1931. Opperman was knighted in 1968.

 

FOM 1940

Italy

 

Lyotard  - Model #240 Course 1940's
France
This rare version lightweight alloy rat trap pedal is easy to identify as it bears the initials of Pierre Lyotard, the company founder in the cage plates.

 

Magna Jeweled Teardrop
Airflow Pedals 1940's

USA
A nice high-end Deluxe pedal with fancy reflector "Jewels" in the end.

 

Monitor New-Lite Pedals 1940's

England
The description on the box of these unique pedals states "The Greatest Advance in Cycle Pedal Design For Over 50 Years". It goes on to say "5 oz. per pair lighter than usual standard". Manufactured by Monitor Cycle Accessories (Monitor Brake Co. Limited) Birmingham. These unique pedals are triangular in shape.

 

OMT 1940's

Italy
A high quality steel quill road pedal similar in design to the Italian Sheffield Sprint pedals.

 

Persons-Majestic 1940's

USA
These pedals were stock equipment on many mid-priced balloon tire bicycles.

 

Persons-Majestic WWII

USA
These pedals were produced during World War II when resources were scarce. The pedal blocks were made of painted wood instead of rubber and the metal is painted black instead of being plated with chrome or nickel.

 

Schwinn 1940's

USA
With its large "AS" (Arnold Schwinn) bottlecap shaped endcaps these rare and now much sought after pedals graced Schwinn's high-end balloon tire classics of the 40's.

 

Phillips 1940's

England
Nicely made alloy platform pedals.

 

Umberto DEI 1940's

Italy
These nicely made pedals were designed by the former bike racer turned legendary bike maker, Umberto Dei. Dei's company produced high-end and light weight racing bikes from the late 1890's to the 1980's. These touring pedals have all alloy quills with unique felt pads for traction.

 

Webb 1940's

England
Webb was one of the high end quill pedal makers in England during the 1940's. The rough finish on the barrel is due to the pedal being rechromed.

 

TA Pedal (First Generation) 1949

France
First generation TA pedals are considered the "Holy Grail" of vintage pedals by seasoned collectors. These pedals are so rare that if you are lucky enough to find them you should be prepared to pay thousands of dollars for them. They feature a cartridge bearing on the outside, a needle bearing on the inside and can be greased through the dustcap. Both the body and cage are made of alloy. The first generation TA pedal can be identified by the four nuts used to attach the quill and no toe strap guide-pin on the the inside of the quill.

 

Phillips Model #353 1940's-1950's

England
These men's classic-style Phillips rubber block pedals are made to be easily rebuildable.

 

Torrington #7 1940's-1950's

USA
The Torrington #7 was a gentleman's touring pedal that came on high end bikes such as Schwinn Paramounts and Superiors.

 

Torrington #9  1940's-1950's

USA
This is the "Ladies" equivalent of the big block Torrington #10 "Men's" pedal. The bodies of Ladies pedals are narrower than those of men's pedals.

 

Sheffield Sprint 1940's-1960's

Italy
The "Sheffield Sprint" was Sheffield's top-of-the-line racing pedal. This jagged-toothed design was the pedal of choice on most high-end Italian racing bikes from the 40's to the 60's.

 

Sheffield Corsa #655  1940's-1950's

Italy
Sheffield was one of the big producers of racing pedals during the 40's and 50's in Italy.
Several models were produced.

 

Sheffield Sprint #673 1940's-1960's

Italy
Popular in their day, these Italian-made racing pedals feature a chromed steel barrel and an alloy quill.

 

Conloy "Cobra" 1940's-1950's

England
One of the pedal versions made by Conloy that were named after snakes. Conloy also made: Viper, Asp, and Boa model pedals. Conloy toe clips were available in: Boa, Constrictor and Python models.

 

Unknown 1940's-1950's

Unknown
Circa 1950's rat trap pedal.

 

Torrington #8 1940's-1960's
USA
Torrington Mens #8 pedals were available with either red or black rubber treads. These high end block pedals were used on many of the high end bicycles of this period..

 

Conloy "Asp" Pedals 1940's-1960's

England
Platform pedal design similar to Lyotard's Marcel Berthet model.

 

Sheffield Sprint Model 658 1940's-1960's

Italy
This attractive pedal design was made in two versions, one with steel cage plates and one with aluminum cage plates. The extra wide cage made this pedal a good choice for riders using street shoes.

 

Way - Assauto Sprint 1940's-1960's

Italy
Made by the Italian firm Way-Assauto or "WA". Way-Assauto was/is a large general industrial firm, named after Luigi Way and Alberto Assauto, and located in Turin. Beginning in 1930 WA produced headsets, bottom brackets, chains, freewheels and hubs in addition to pedals. WA is still in business today but they only manufacture car parts etc. WA pedals typically came on Frejus, Atala, and Legnano racing bicycles.

 

Lyotard Model 15S 1940's-1960's
France
This "solid center" single-sided pedal is made of all chrome plated steel. Like all of Lyotard's premium pedals these pedals have a solid center or a one piece barrel instead of the less costly three piece barrel design of the less expensive Lyotard models. The oil clip on the pedal barrel allows easy bearing lubrication.

 

Lyotard Model CA45 1940's-1970's
France
This nice quality lightweight alloy quill pedal was sold at a very competitive price for many years.

 

Lyotard Model 460D 1940's-1970's
France
Made primarily as a touring pedal this Lyotard model was also popular for cyclocross racing.

 

Bianchi 1950
Italy
These rare Bianchi logoed pedals were made for Bianchi by Noli-Cattaneo (or Sheffield as they were later known).

 

Lyotard Unknown Model 1950's?
France
Solid centered touring rat trap pedal that isn't referenced in early Lyotard catalogs we have encountered.

 

Lyotard 1950's-1960's
France
The alloy cages of these pedals are covered with steel wear plates for durability.

 

Raleigh Record Ace Pedals 1947-1953
England
Known as "RRA" pedals, these aluminum bodied, steel quilled pedals feature the Raleigh "Heron Crest" stamped into the cage plates. These pedals came on Raleigh's top of the line Record Ace bicycles.

 

Atom 700
1950's- 1970's

France
This Atom pedal has a chromed plated quill with teeth on both sides.

 

American Safety Equipment
Corp - PEDALITE 1950's

USA
Long before the modern "LED" light was introduced to make cycling safer these unique pedals were made with two "D" cells and a mercury switch that turned on the lights when the pedals were flipped to the non-weighted side.

 

Tank - Merveille Styx Minax 1950's

France

This is a steel-toothed rat-trap version is one of Tank's four pedal product line. Tank made three different versions of rat-trap style pedals and one version of racing quill pedal.

 

Tank 1950's

France

This model of Tank pedal was made for commuter bikes.

 

Phillips Philite #166 1950's
England
The alloy cage plates on this lightweight touring pedal have steel strips on the edges to prevent wear.

   

Atom 1950's

France
This Atom quill pedal has a steel frame and cage with an aluminum alloy barrel and dust cap.

 

Phillips "Apollo" Pedals 1950's

England
These nicely made chromed steel rat trap pedals came stock on Phillips and Raleigh lightweight bicycles during the 1950's and 1960's.

 

Phillips Credalux 1950's

England
This pedal has a steel frame and cage.

 

Phillips Touring Pedals 1950's

England
Phillips began producing bicycle components and pedals as early as 1938 and continued until they were acquired by Ti Raleigh in 1960. Phillips was best known for their lightweight “Roadster” 3-speed bicycles. The brand was eventually retired by Raleigh.

 

Prior Touring Pedals 1950's

France
These exceptional touring pedals have aluminum barrels, aluminum cage plates, aluminum caps and even aluminum nuts. The white blocks complete a very beautiful pair of pedals that would make the perfect finishing touch to a Herse or Singer porteur bike.

 

Lyotard Model #36 1950's - 1970's

France
Typical rat-trap touring pedal from this period.

 

Sansax 1950's

France
This Sansax drop-spindle pedal design is unique and very rare. The name Sansax means "without spindle". This pedal was a favorite of by Camille Daudon, a noted custom bicycle frame builder in Paris. The body of the pedal is inscribed "roulements annulaires" Breveté SGDG.

 

Lyotard Track #45A 1950's

France
Nicely made traditional light weight quill pedals with an aluminum alloy body and cage.

 

Cyclo 1950's

England
Champion du Monde model. Made of steel and alloy.

 

Strada Pedals 1950's

England
These nicely made quill pedals were produced by Strata Engineering Co., Ltd.,  located in Newbreck Mill, Oldham.  The quills, frame plates, and dust caps were all made of alloy and the one piece barrel was made of chrome plated steel.  Strata was also known for their high quality toe clips, toe straps and caliper brakes.

 

Lyotard Model #25A
1950's - 1960's

France
This chromed-steel touring version of Lyotard pedal features flattened areas for riding with street shoes and has aluminum dust caps.

 

Roger Piel 1950's

France
Unique lubrication method allows grease to be injected to the pedal bushings by removing a cage screw and pumping grease in through the screw hole.

 

Campagnolo Gran Sport
1st Generation 1956

Italy
This extraordinarily rare pedal is Campagnolo’s original road pedal design. The unique feature of this pedal is the closed quill-tip with its triangular cutout. This pedal features the early spindle type with the "shorter" 10mm threaded section for use with cranks with capped pedal holes and a rubber "O" ring seal instead of the "rifled" type seal found on later spindles.

 

Campagnolo Gran Sport 1957-1959

Italy
These pedals feature an aluminum body with a chrome plated stamped steel cage and have a single outer toe strap loop. These second generation Campagnolo pedals are best identified by the "short" threaded section of the spindle. These pedals were designed for use on steel cranksets and Campy's earliest 1958 & 1959 alloy cranks. The threaded section of the spindle is shorter at 10mm on these pedals than on similar later 12mm versions of the same pedal that were designed to fit the newer aluminum cranks. These early pedals also have a chromed steel dustcap with an oil hole in the center.

 

Campagnolo Pista 1st generation
Con Dente 1958

Italy
This exceedingly rare version of "Con Dente" track pedal, produced in 1958 has aluminum cage plates rather than the chromed steel cage plates found on all later Con Dente pedals. This pedal features the early spindle type with the "shorter" 10mm threaded section for use with cranks with capped pedal holes and has a rubber "O" ring seal instead of the "rifled" type seal found on later spindles.

 

Campagnolo 1960's

Italy
This is a rare example of a Campagnolo branded road pedal made by the Italian firm Way-Assauto or "WA". These pedals were not included in any Campagnolo catalogs. These Campagnolo branded pedals shown are similar to WA' "Zenith Corsa 18 Extra Lusso" pedals circa 1950s-1960s. This rare and unusual Campagnolo pedal has an all steel body and cage with two toe strap loops.

 

Schwinn Small-Cap Bow Pedals
1950's-1960's

Germany
Made for Schwinn by Union in Germany. These bow pedals came on several high-end Schwinns including Phantoms, and later Stingrays and Krates.

 

Sheffield Model #663
1950's-1960's

Italy
An economy touring version of pedal made by Sheffield. This version has zinc plate rather than chrome.

 

Sheffield Corsa #645
1950's-1960's

Italy
This model was an all-steel version of Sheffield's similar but higher-end #673 alloy quill racing pedal.

 

Campagnolo Gran Sport #1038/1
1959-1969

Italy
2nd generation Pista con Denti model with chromed steel cage-plates. Campagnolo also introduced a toothless model - #1038 the same year.

 

Frejus Quill Pedals 1960's

Italy
Frejus was a well known Italian builder of quality racing bikes during the 60's and 70's. In addition to bicycles they sold a number of components under the Frejus brand. These pedals were likely made by Way Assauto for Frejus as the dust caps and construction of both pedals are indistinguishable.

 

Kwik-Speed 1960's

USA
This was the world's first all plastic body pedal. The self-lubricating (Polyethylene) plastic body was used as a bearing and it simply rotated directly on the spindle. Retail price was $1.49 per pair.

 

Laffont Super-Light 1960's

France
Made from a one piece aluminum casting, these pedals feature needle and cartridge bearings and weigh about 280 grams per pair. They also had very short spindles which helped to improve cornering clearance.

 

Phillips Celtonia #61 Pedals 1960's

England
This traditional "Gents" rat trap style pedal features a very wide platform and gleaming chrome.

 

Roto 1960's

Italy
The end caps say Roto but the design and construction are almost identical to earlier Way Assauto pedals. They have a toe flip tab added and they have a longer (12mm) threaded area on the spindle. Possibly made for Roto by Way Assauto or they are a very close copy.

 

Schwinn 1960's-1970's
Germany
These popular pedals were spec'ed on Stingrays, Jaguars and numerous other Schwinn bike models. After 1970 these pedals were fitted with reflectors.

 

Schwinn Approved #57505
1960's-1970's

Germany
Made for Schwinn by Union of Germany, these pre-reflector pedals came on a variety of Schwinn bikes including Stingrays.

 

Rabeneick 1970

Germany
Steel cage on an alloy body.

 

Atom 1960's -1970's

France
This is the early version Atom pedal. The cage on this version is reinforced by stamped metal parts and the dust cap has a slot.

 

Schwinn Approved Part # 5790
1960's-1970's

Germany
This may be a familiar pedal to many American cyclists because it was likely to be their first rat trap pedal. Whether it was on a Stingray or on a Varsity, this is the "beginner" rat trap pedal that many cyclists used (to scrape their shins on) during their introduction to cycling.

 

Atom Model 600 1970's

France
French clone of the popular
Campagnolo design.

 

East Rochester 1970's

USA
Made by the East Rochester Tool and Die Company in the early 1970's. These lightweight pedals with sealed bearings and a choice of titanium or steel spindles were produced to compete with Campagnolo's popular pedals.

 

Atom - Late 1970's

France
This is the second verion Atom pedal. The cage on this version is reinforced with "bars" and it has a chromed dust cap. These pedals came on Schwinn mid-range road bikes including the Continental.

 

Phil Wood CHP 1970's

USA
Named because the California Highway Patrol had approved it. Built-in reflectors in an extruded aluminum platform with sealed bearings.

 

Raleigh REA 153 1970's

England
These sylish logoed platform pedals came standard on the first version Raleigh Chopper bikes among others.

 

Schwinn Approved/Union 1970's

Germany
Reflectorized rubber block pedals.

 

Sheffield Model 960 1970's

Italy
This pedal set is the last known model produced by the Sheffield pedal brand. It is clearly patterned after Campagnolo's quill pedals.

 

Skyway Tuff Pedals 1970's

USA
A BMX racing pedal that is very lightweight by virtue of its ball-bearingless design, thermoplastic body and aluminum cage plates. The graphite-reinfored nylon body rotates directly on a pedal spindle that is lubricated only with a thin film of grease. Skyway was best known for their popular one-piece plastic Tuff Wheels for BMX bikes.

 

Gipiemme 1970's

Italy
Aerodynamically designed with superior cornering clearance.

 

Unknown Maker Possibly 1970's

France
This is a novel design for an aero-type pedal and cleat.

 

Viscount/Lambert 1970's

England
Curiously this pedal used two needle bearings without any type of thrust bearings. The company eventually failed due to manufacturing problems with their other components.

 

Weyless Early 1970's

USA
Lightweight CNC’ed alloy body with sealed bearings and a replaceable alloy quill.

 

Campagnolo Record
Superleggeri #1037/A 1971

Italy
Quill made from black anodized aluminum. Sold new in the US for $37.50.

 

Schwinn 1971

Germany
These "small white reflector" pedals came stock on 1971 Schwinn Stingray Krates and Grey Ghost model bikes. Made for only one year, they are very rare and highly coveted by Stingray collecters.

 

Campagnolo Super Record 1973

Italy
Campagnolo's super-premium version of their alloy road pedal featured a titanium spindle and a black-annodized aluminum cage.

 

Campagnolo Super Record Pista 1973
Italy
Quill is made from black anodized aluminum. Spindle is titanium.

 

Bob Reedy 1974

USA
An early lightweight road pedal that is almost identical to the Weyless design.

 

Bob Reedy 1974-1978

USA
BMX Pedal.

 

Barelli Supreme 1977

Britain
Barelli made a variety of high quality alloy pedals and nail-on slotted cleats.

 

Routens JPR Special Pedals 1977

France
These cast aluminum pedals were produced by the son of legendary French bike builder Jo Routens when he took over the company. JPR, as the company was known, also produced hubs, seatposts and a variety of other components.

 

Suntour Superbe 1977

Japan
These first generation Suntour Superbe pedals were beautifully made copies of Campagnolo pedals. They came as part of the Suntour Superbe groupo.

 

Barelli B-10 1978

England
This is a rare touring pedal with a special dedicated cleat from Barelli.

 

Hi-E 1978

USA
Unique drop-spindle design with matching nail mount shoe cleat.

 

Mavic First Version 1979

France
A very rare example of the pedal Mavic produced for their first road group. Note that the un-anodized cage is riveted instead of screwed to the frame. The body profile is more traditional in shape than on that of the later version and these pedals came with a plastic dust cap instead of aluminum.

 

Campagnolo Model 305/BMX 1980

Italy
Responding to the increasing popularity of BMX racing, Campagnolo made these high quality pedals as part of a BMX group that included hubs and cranks. The BMX group was available in Silver, Blue and Gold.

 

Titron BMX Pedals 1980

USA
Produced by Bill Grove, a pioneer BMX mechanic and designer. Grove's business, Titron BMX, made parts such as pedals, axles, seat post clamps and headset locks. Grove went on to head design for Hutch BMX and his pedals eventually became branded with the Hutch name. As BMX matured, Bill Grove's early designs have garnered something of a cult status among collectors and his BMX pedals and other parts are now both exceptionally rare and valuable. If you can find a pair of these "Holy Grail" BMX pedals now, the going rate is over $1000 a pair.

 

Avocet 1980's

Italy
These Avocet branded pedals were made by Gipiemme in Italy. The body of the pedal was made of plastic to reduce weight.

 

LLC 1980's

Germany
These well made pedals came from Germany but nothing more is known about their history. The cage is made of stainless steel, the body is alloy and they have a nifty grease-injection port. The very short spindle and high cage profile suggest that they are designed for, or are at least, particularly suitable for track racing.

 

LLC Superlight Pedals 1980's

Germany
These extremely lightweight pedals are made entirely out of aluminum - including the spindle.

 

MKS Footjaw BMX Pedal 1980's

USA
Made by Mikashima Industrial, the Footjaw was a popular low cost BMX pedal.

 

Kyokuto Pro Ace SL 1980's

Japan
Unlike most Pro Ace pedals which have steel quills, this version has anodized aluminum quills. Strangely, these pedals have no toe flip.

 

Raleigh Pedals 1980's

England
Logoed Raleigh pedals.

 

Saavedra Giorgia Competicion 1980's

Argentina
A nicely made clone of the Campagnolo pista pedal from Saavedra, a South American bicycle component manufacturer better known for their rims and headsets.

 

Bullseye BMX 1980

USA
This rare BMX pedal was designed by Bullseye's Roger Durham and made in 1980. Bullseye was well known in the 70's and 80's for making a variety of innovative high quality components for bicycles including: hubs, derailleur pulleys and hollow steel cranksets. The spindle on this pedal is made of chrome-moly and the pedal body and replaceable cage are made of anodized aluminum. Each Bullseye pedal runs an outboard cartridge bearing and an inboard needle bearing. The pedal is designed to be installed using a hex key.

 

Maillard - Atom 1980's

France
Economy version aero pedal with a die-cast body.

 

Suntour Cyclone 1980's

Japan
These second-tier level pedals from Suntour's lineup feature cup and cone bearings.

 

Suntour Superbe 1981

Japan
Highly polished body with sealed bearings. Sold new for $94.99.

 

Suntour BMX 1981

Japan
These popular sealed bearing pedals came with replaceable cages in red, gold and blue.

 

Suntour XC Compe 1981

Japan
This was the off-road version of Suntour's popular "Superbe" road pedal.

 

Shimano Deore PD-DE10 Dyna-Drive 1982

Japan
Shimano decided to oversize the pedal and crank arm interface to a 1” diameter to improve aerodynamics and eliminate the spindle. The design never caught on so Shimano pedals soon went back to the standard 9/16” spindle diameter.

 

MKS Esquartz 1983

Japan
An aero-style platform pedal by MKS (Mikashima). MKS is one of only a few companies left that continues to manufacture quality quill-style pedals and toe clips.

 

Suntour XC-1 Pedals 1982

Japan
These first generation Suntour BMX/MTB pedals had extremely sharp teeth, a feature that was eliminated in later models.

 

Shimano AX Dyna-Drive 1981-1984

Japan
Aerodynamic drop-spindle design. Required a specially threaded crank.
Part of the AX component group.


 

Suntour XC - II 1983

Japan
These Suntour "beartrap" style pedals were prized by both BMX riders and early mountain bike riders.

 

Zeus Titanium 1982

Spain
Both spindle and quill on this pedal were made of titanium.

 

Campagnolo 50th Anniversary
Groupo Pedals 1983

Italy
These special pedals were produced as part of a limited edition groupo to commemerate Campagnolo's 50th year anniversary. These pedals feature: a highly polished alloy body embossed with Tullio Campagnolo's signature, a black annodized cage, 24 carat gold-plated dustcap inserts and titanium spindles.

 

Shimano DX BMX Pedals 1983
Japan
The DX pedal was a very popular early 80's BMX racing pedal. Not only did it function well as a racing pedal but it also proved useful as a beverage bottle opener.

 

Specialized Track Pedal 1984

Japan
A nicely made track pedal branded by Specialized and manufactured by MKS.

 

Specialized Touring Pedal 1984

Japan
A nicely made big touring pedal branded by Specialized and manufactured by MKS.

 

Hutch Beartrap 1985

USA
Gnarly toothed, large and unforgiving to shins. Hutch pedals were the original BMX pedal. Vintage Hutch pedals like these now sell on Ebay to collectors for about $350.00.

 

Shimano PD-MX15 1985

Japan
This second generation BMX pedal design, complete with reflectors was produced in the Mid 1980's.

 

Vittoria Titanium 1985

Italy
Thermoplastic body with cartridge bearings and titanium spindles. Probably the lightest quill pedals ever at 75g each. Included plastic toe clip screws. Vittoria also made these with steel spindle.

 

Assos 1986

Switzerland
Short steel spindle made for good cornering clearance.Known for making high quality cycling clothing, Assos also produced some hard goods including pedals and rims.

 

Shimano Deore XT M730 1987

Japan
Shimano's original MTB pedal featured a large bear trap cage design with a parallelogram side profile to facilitate easier entry. The barrel of the pedal also had protruding metal studs to improve traction when using
rubber soled shoes.

 

Mavic Model #640 1988

France
Part of Mavic’s SSC component group. Came with needle and cartridge bearings.

 

Shimano Dura-Ace 7400 1988

Japan
Aerodynamic design, three bearings per pedal and very good cornering clearance. Came with special PD64 cleats that engaged both the front and back edges of the pedal cage for secure sprinting. Mounted to contemporary shoes with a 3-hole Look mounting.

 

Suntour GPX Model PL-GP00 1989

Japan
This touring pedal was part of Suntours midrange GPX group set. It has a chrome moly spindle, cup and cone bearings and a die cast aluminum body with a pearl blue color painted finish.

 

Campagolo Chorus 705/000 Late 1980's

Italy
Mid-range version of Campagnolo's lineup with an aero design.

 

Sugino Aero Mighty Pedals Late 1980's

Japan
These rare pedals by MKS feature a forged body with cup and cone bearings. The poorly engineered "bent up aluminum" design of the rear cage plate may well be the reason that these pedals are now so obscure.

 

Campagolo Euclid SM Version 1990

Italy
A high-end Campagnolo mountain bike pedal. The SM version is made with a narrow cage for improved corner clearance. Another version had a rounded cage for use with regular athletic shoes.

 

Campagnolo Triomphe 1990's

Italy
Large platform aero-style pedal that is made to conform nicely to the shape of an ordinary street style shoe.

 

Campagnolo Euclid 1990-1991

Italy
This version of Euclid pedal was made to work with traditional rubber athletic shoes and comes with a set of plastic insert-type cage covers that sandwich the rat trap style pedals and convert them into platform type pedals. They also come with a set of heavy duty plastic "mini" toe clips that do not accept toe straps.

 

Campagnolo Croce d'Aune 1991

Italy
Campagnolo's last generation of quill pedals for toe clips and straps. Used Record-grade bearings and included Campagnolo's best quality toe strap and toe clips.

 

Campagnolo Record TBS 1991

Italy
This is Campagnolo's top-of-the-line pedal from the early 90's. Similar to the Croce d'Aune series but this version featured replacable black annodized cages.

 

Shimano Deore XT M735 1991

Japan
Considered by many to be Shimano's best-ever traditional MTB pedal.

 

Suntour XC Pro 1991

Japan
This Suntour pedal included Wilderness Trails Bikes proprietary "GreaseGuard" system as well as having WTB's "Toe Flips" built into the cage. These pedals were popular with mountain bike riders until clipless pedals took over.

 

Thompson Timeless Transition 1991

USA
Made to allow short course Biathletes a way to use their running shoes with their clipless pedals to speed run to bike transitions.

 

Campagnolo Olympus 1991

Italy
Similar to Record OR, these pedals were part of the Olympus mountain bike group.

 

Campagnolo Record OR 1992

Italy
Campy's top-of-the-line off road platform pedal was doomed from the start by the budding popularity of off road clipless pedals.

 

Suntour MicroLite 1992

Japan
The lightest off-road pedal ever produced by Suntour. This pedal features an alloy body and quill and a titanium spindle.

 


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